Janelle Asselin

Editor. Geek. Feminist.

Looking for freelance!

As many people know, I’ve been dealing with some health stuff over the last few months that’s been super frustrating. I haven’t been able to drive most days and mobility is occasionally an issue, although I have no trouble being on a computer when it’s my laptop at home. It’s for that reason that I’m no longer on staff at Sideshow and will now be looking to take on some freelance. I have my contacts that I’m going to hit up for writing/editing stuff (you’re forewarned!) but if anyone can spread the word it would be much appreciated.

In case you don’t know me, I have almost a decade of experience as a comic book editor, a Masters of Science in Publishing, and have been working as a journalist for a year in my spare time for sites like ComicsAlliance and Bitch. My focus has been almost entirely on comics and representation but I’m happy to write about other pop culture stuff and feminist issues and things related to all of the above. Editing is where my heart is and I definitely love to edit anything but particularly comics. More information about my background is all over this site. 

I will say that for the time being I’m going to be super discerning about what and how much freelance I take on in order to be as responsible as possible about my health and stress levels. Work I do take on will be given my full attention but if I have to turn down work offered it’s entirely for health reasons. My top priorities are getting well and not letting anyone down! Thanks for understanding!

Finally, you can email me at janelle.m.asselin at gmail dot com. 

How Big of a Problem is Harassment at Comic Conventions? Very Big. | Bitch Media

I wrote about the sexual harassment survey I conducted and what it means for comic conventions.

Gender and Comics Panel

You like gender and comics? *I* like gender and comics. What is happening?!

Sorry, my inner Mabel kicked in. Anyway, I’ll be at the Gender and Comics Panel at San Diego Comic-Con this Friday at 10am in Room 4. Here are the details:


Panelists explore both the role of gender in mainstream and independent comics, as well as the impact of gender politics on the business side of the industry and in the media. Moderated by comics editor Janelle Asselin, the panel inclides ComicsAlliance.com senior editor Andy Khouri, BOOM! Studios editor Dafna Pleban, comics writer James Tynion IV (The Woods), Image comics director of trade book sales Jennifer de Guzman, and WIRED writer Laura Hudson and IDW publishing editor Sarah Gaydos.

For all the details go here



comicsalliance:

HIRE THIS WOMAN: WRITER ERICA SCHULTZ
By Janelle Asselin
In the overwhelmingly male comic book industry, it has been a challenge for some editors and readers to see the ever growing number of talented women currently trying to make a name for themselves. With that in mind, ComicsAlliance offers Hire This Woman, a recurring feature designed for comics readers as well as editors and other professionals, where we shine the spotlight on a female comics pro on the ascendance. Some of these women will be at the very beginning of their careers, while others will be more experienced but not yet “household names.”
Writer Erica Schultz has worked on her creator-owned crime comic, M3, as well as The Unauthorized Biography of Winston Churchill: A Documentary with previous Hire This Woman featured artist Claire Connelly. Next up she has Revenge: The Secret Origin of Emily Thorne coming out for Marvel and ABC Studios, which readers can see a preview of at San Diego Comic-Con next week.
READ MORE

comicsalliance:

HIRE THIS WOMAN: WRITER ERICA SCHULTZ

By Janelle Asselin

In the overwhelmingly male comic book industry, it has been a challenge for some editors and readers to see the ever growing number of talented women currently trying to make a name for themselves. With that in mind, ComicsAlliance offers Hire This Woman, a recurring feature designed for comics readers as well as editors and other professionals, where we shine the spotlight on a female comics pro on the ascendance. Some of these women will be at the very beginning of their careers, while others will be more experienced but not yet “household names.”

Writer Erica Schultz has worked on her creator-owned crime comic, M3, as well as The Unauthorized Biography of Winston Churchill: A Documentary with previous Hire This Woman featured artist Claire Connelly. Next up she has Revenge: The Secret Origin of Emily Thorne coming out for Marvel and ABC Studios, which readers can see a preview of at San Diego Comic-Con next week.

READ MORE

Literary representation!

It’s official - I have a literary agent. Any and all inquiries about book-length business can be directed at the awesome Maria Vicente of P.S. Literary Agency. Her email is maria@psliterary.com. 

Comic Creator Pay

gimpnelly:

Hey folks - I’m doing survey on comics creator pay and I’d really love to have your input! Please fill this out and share!  

comicsalliance:

THE ‘F’ WORD: WONDER WOMAN’S FEMINISM SHOULDN’T BE COVERED UP
By Janelle Asselin
DC has a Wonder Woman problem. Or perhaps more accurately, Wonder Woman has a DC problem. The idea of Wonder Woman as a feminist icon is so imprinted in her history, and in analysis of the character, that separating her from feminism should be near impossible. But that hasn’t stopped people trying.
Much has been written over the years about the ebb and flow of feminism in the Wonder Woman comics, the relative feminism of her appearances on the small screen, and her role as an icon for the movement. A recent interview with the new Wonder Woman creative team of Meredith Finch and David Finch has brought the topic back into focus.
To give a bit of background for those who may need it, the character’s creator, William Moulton Marston, was actually not a feminist – he didn’t believe that men and women were equal; he believed that women were superior to men. Most of the early Wonder Woman stories were about women dominating men to make the world a better place.
This isn’t feminism, because feminism is about all genders being equal. It’s an interesting world view, though, and one Marston believed would see fruition through the events of World War II. Women were gaining power as Wonder Woman’s story began, thanks to more women entering the work place to replace men who had gone to fight.
The character’s roots in an island made up entirely of women explains any belief she had in female superiority. However, Wonder Woman has evolved to be more of a true feminist.
Over the years, Wonder Woman’s story arcs have ranged from feminism to par-for-the-superheroine-course. Like all other female characters, she’s too often used as a prop in storylines about male characters, but unlike most other female characters she had a unique tool: her own television show.
That show, occurring when it did in the 1970s, struck a chord with women of all ages and cemented Wonder Woman’s place in the culture. She had already famously featured on the cover of the first issue of the feminist magazine Ms. in 1972, and for decades after, regardless of the quality of the comics, Wonder Woman has remained a feminist icon.
READ MORE

I also wrote about how Wonder Woman’s feminism is at the core of the character and how it’s disappointing when writers, artists, or DC try to divorce her from that. 

comicsalliance:

THE ‘F’ WORD: WONDER WOMAN’S FEMINISM SHOULDN’T BE COVERED UP

By Janelle Asselin

DC has a Wonder Woman problem. Or perhaps more accurately, Wonder Woman has a DC problem. The idea of Wonder Woman as a feminist icon is so imprinted in her history, and in analysis of the character, that separating her from feminism should be near impossible. But that hasn’t stopped people trying.

Much has been written over the years about the ebb and flow of feminism in the Wonder Woman comics, the relative feminism of her appearances on the small screen, and her role as an icon for the movement. A recent interview with the new Wonder Woman creative team of Meredith Finch and David Finch has brought the topic back into focus.

To give a bit of background for those who may need it, the character’s creator, William Moulton Marston, was actually not a feminist – he didn’t believe that men and women were equal; he believed that women were superior to men. Most of the early Wonder Woman stories were about women dominating men to make the world a better place.

This isn’t feminism, because feminism is about all genders being equal. It’s an interesting world view, though, and one Marston believed would see fruition through the events of World War II. Women were gaining power as Wonder Woman’s story began, thanks to more women entering the work place to replace men who had gone to fight.

The character’s roots in an island made up entirely of women explains any belief she had in female superiority. However, Wonder Woman has evolved to be more of a true feminist.

Over the years, Wonder Woman’s story arcs have ranged from feminism to par-for-the-superheroine-course. Like all other female characters, she’s too often used as a prop in storylines about male characters, but unlike most other female characters she had a unique tool: her own television show.

That show, occurring when it did in the 1970s, struck a chord with women of all ages and cemented Wonder Woman’s place in the culture. She had already famously featured on the cover of the first issue of the feminist magazine Ms. in 1972, and for decades after, regardless of the quality of the comics, Wonder Woman has remained a feminist icon.

READ MORE

I also wrote about how Wonder Woman’s feminism is at the core of the character and how it’s disappointing when writers, artists, or DC try to divorce her from that. 

comicsalliance:

PAST OBSESSION: AN INTERVIEW WITH ‘PHOTOBOOTH: A BIOGRAPHY’ AUTHOR MEAGS FITZGERALD
By Janelle Asselin
Last week Meags Fitzgerald‘s new graphic memoir Photobooth: A Biography debuted and completely blew me away. Fitzgerald is an artist who works in a variety of mediums, including improv, comics, and photobooth photography.
Photobooth, published by Condundrum Press, is not just Fizgerald’s love letter to the seemingly dying phenomenon of the chemical photobooth. The author intertwines historical information about the creation and evolution of the photobooth with stories about her interactions with them, and how they changed her life. It’s a book about a woman who has come to passionately love something so much that it takes over too much of her life — an idea that should resonate with many readers.
One fascinating thing about Photobooth is that it’s not truly a comic. It’s more of a heavily-illustrated non-fiction book. There isn’t a lot of narrative from illustration to illustration, especially not in the way that comics readers would expect. The images could not stand alone to tell a story, though the text could technically stand without the illustrations.
That being said, it’s a beautiful book where the art provides important visual reference. Many of Fitzgerald’s own photobooth photos are recreated in the book, as are many active photobooths she’s visited. There’s a realism to Fitzgerald’s art that at times is closer to photography than illustrations, and these stunningly recreated images help to really immerse the reader in the world of photobooths.
Ultimately, it’s that immersion that is the point of the book. It represents both Fitzgerald’s personal immersion and her hope that you too will become immersed and care about a form of photography that is not going to be around forever.
As a lover of photography, photobooths, and antiques as well as someone who has consistently struggled with balancing interest and obsession, I decided to speak to Fitzgerald about Photobooth and the intentions behind it.
READ MORE

I loved this book so I wrote about it! And interviewed the super talented author/artist Meags Fitzgerald.

comicsalliance:

PAST OBSESSION: AN INTERVIEW WITH ‘PHOTOBOOTH: A BIOGRAPHY’ AUTHOR MEAGS FITZGERALD

By Janelle Asselin

Last week Meags Fitzgerald‘s new graphic memoir Photobooth: A Biography debuted and completely blew me away. Fitzgerald is an artist who works in a variety of mediums, including improv, comics, and photobooth photography.

Photobooth, published by Condundrum Press, is not just Fizgerald’s love letter to the seemingly dying phenomenon of the chemical photobooth. The author intertwines historical information about the creation and evolution of the photobooth with stories about her interactions with them, and how they changed her life. It’s a book about a woman who has come to passionately love something so much that it takes over too much of her life — an idea that should resonate with many readers.

One fascinating thing about Photobooth is that it’s not truly a comic. It’s more of a heavily-illustrated non-fiction book. There isn’t a lot of narrative from illustration to illustration, especially not in the way that comics readers would expect. The images could not stand alone to tell a story, though the text could technically stand without the illustrations.

That being said, it’s a beautiful book where the art provides important visual reference. Many of Fitzgerald’s own photobooth photos are recreated in the book, as are many active photobooths she’s visited. There’s a realism to Fitzgerald’s art that at times is closer to photography than illustrations, and these stunningly recreated images help to really immerse the reader in the world of photobooths.

Ultimately, it’s that immersion that is the point of the book. It represents both Fitzgerald’s personal immersion and her hope that you too will become immersed and care about a form of photography that is not going to be around forever.

As a lover of photography, photobooths, and antiques as well as someone who has consistently struggled with balancing interest and obsession, I decided to speak to Fitzgerald about Photobooth and the intentions behind it.

READ MORE

I loved this book so I wrote about it! And interviewed the super talented author/artist Meags Fitzgerald.

What Dixon And Rivoche Get Wrong About The Comics Industry

I’m really proud of this piece!

Hire This Woman

I’ve been lax in posting all my Hire This Woman columns, but you can find them all here: 

http://comicsalliance.com/tags/hire-this-woman/